"Monte Amiata"

The mystical mountain of Tuscany

View from La Rogaia  towards Monte Amiata in the evening
View from La Rogaia towards Monte Amiata in the evening

 

When Monte Amiata seems to float on the horizon in the evening's sunlight, the sight is almost mystical.

Although the last eruption of Mount Amiata happened already 180,000 years ago, hot springs and geysers around the mountain still witness its volcanic origin.

The slopes of Amiata are densely wooded with chestnut, beech, spruce and oaks and are ideal for hiking. Especially for children it is great fun to climb into the large boulders.

With patience and a little luck you can observe snake eagles, Egyptian vultures, Lanner Falcons, mouflons, wolves and many other species.

 

Bagno Vignoni

You can recover from your hike up to Mount Amiata by relaxing in one of the many spas in the vicinity, e.g. at Bagno Vignoni. Since the Middle Ages this quaint village has a swimming pool instead of a central market place. It is fed by hot springs all year round and has been used already by Saint Catherine of Siena and Lorenzo di Medici.  A truly unique sight!

The central square of Bagno Vignoni is a swimming pool
The central square of Bagno Vignoni is a swimming pool

Montalcino

Montalcino, home of the famous Brunello wines
Montalcino, home of the famous Brunello wines

Or you can finish off your day with a glass of fine Brunello wine at Montalcino. The grapes for this prestigious wine grow at the foot of the Amiata.

Upon request we can organize wine tastings of Brunello and other wines with a qualified wine connoisseur on the spot or, conveniently, right at the Villa La Rogaia, with spectacular views of Mount Amiata.

For late summer and autumn you can still book one of our apartments at La Rogaia.

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If you feel like a last minute vacation and are still looking for a beautiful destination, get in touch with us. We will send you more information and a detailed offer!

Landscape around Monte Amiata. Photo: Helen Malbon
Landscape around Monte Amiata. Photo: Helen Malbon

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